Are you preparing for a colonoscopy? Have you had a colonoscopy? What tips can you add to our list?


Having a colonoscopy sure doesn’t top your list of favorite things to do. If you could, you’d put it off indefinitely. But at some point, it’s got to be done — so go ahead and get it scheduled.

The bowel prep and liquid diet the day before aren’t going to be pleasant. With a few helpful tips from your HysterSisters, however, the overall experience can be less stressful.

Read more about Do This – Not That: Having a Colonoscopy

What steps are you taking to minimize your risk for heart disease during menopause?


If you’ve reached menopause, your risk factors for heart disease are rising. For one, you’re getting older. But there’s more to it than how many birthdays are behind you.

Even if you’ve been healthy all of your life, menopause throws a kink in the works – whether it’s natural or surgical menopause. Why? Many of the symptoms of menopause can be harmful to your heart.

Read more Menopause and Heart Disease – Know the Connection

What helped you and your hysterectomy recovery?


No one knows better than a HysterSister the ups and downs, ins and outs of hysterectomy recovery. What’s normal? What’s allowed? When will I feel better? What questions should I ask?

All these questions and more are answered in the HysterSisters Hysterectomy Recovery Forum, but here is a collection of helpful, non-medical advice for 15 of the most common concerns during hysterectomy recovery.

Be sure to visit Part 1 and Part 2, too!

Read more about 15 Hot Topics for Hysterectomy Recovery – Part 3

Wondering about the difference between spinal and epidural? What type of anesthesia did you have?


Both spinal and epidural are types of regional anesthesia that can be used during gynecologic surgeries such as a hysterectomy. For hysterectomy, they both involve injections into the lower back to numb the abdominal and pelvic regions for surgery.

For a spinal, the medications will be injected directly into the cerebrospinal fluid using a much smaller needle. For an epidural, a larger needle is used to inject the medications into the space between the outer membrane and the spinal cord; it will not be injected directly into the spinal fluid but rather next to the membrane protecting the spinal fluid.

Read more about Anesthesia | Spinal vs. Epidural.

Have you had a colonoscopy? How often have you had a colonoscopy?


Most women have heard of a colonoscopy. If you’ve never had one, you probably aren’t too anxious to schedule one any time soon. If you’re over 50, you need to rethink your plan.

Thankfully, it’s not as bad as it sounds. It’s also beneficial for you and important for your overall health. Besides checking the inside of your colon, it could help diagnosis some pelvic floor dysfunctions. More importantly, however, it could save your life.

Read more about How Important Is A Colonoscopy?

Steps to being heart smart during menopause – What has helped you stay heart smart during menopause?


If, despite all the red flags, you do nothing to minimize your risks for heart disease, you could suddenly find yourself dealing with a life threatening stroke or heart attack. Complacency and ignoring the warning signs of heart disease can kill you. If you do manage to live through the experience, you could have permanent, irreversible heart damage which will negatively impact you for the rest of your life. A stroke can also leave you physically and mentally impaired.

Is that what you want? Isn’t it better to take the time now to make better choices for better health?

Read more about 10 Steps to Being Heart Smart During Menopause.

Was coming home after your hysterectomy a bit scary? What tips helped ease your mind with being home from surgery?


Mixed feelings about going home after surgery are normal. The noisy hustle and bustle of the hospital may make you long for your own bed. Yet, the thought of being at home without a skilled nursing staff a button push away can be daunting. Here are some tips that can help you manage the transition from hospital to home.

First, keep a notebook and pen handy in the hospital. You may be too groggy and weary to remember questions you have, so writing them down (or having someone write them for you) when you think of them is a great idea. You can also use it to write down any helpful instructions shared by the nursing staff. To help you manage your pain medications safely, you can also use your notebook to keep track of when you take your medications so you don’t accidentally take more or less than prescribed.

Read more about Going Home after Hysterectomy.

Were other conditions causing you to take medical marijuana before your hysterectomy? Did you stop medical marijuana before your surgery?


If you are using marijuana—medical or otherwise—and are scheduled for a hysterectomy, you should stop using it at least two weeks prior to your scheduled date. The interactions between marijuana and anesthesia in your system could have negative, and possibly dangerous effects.

Anesthesia and marijuana act on some of the same body systems; namely, the nervous, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems. Combined, the two drugs can result in decreased or enhanced reactions depending on the severity of the drug usage.

Read more about Medical Marijuana Before Hysterectomy. 

How do you manage your PCOS?


Despite its name, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) involves more than just the ovaries. It’s a disorder of the entire endocrine system. If PCOS is not managed well, you’re at risk for developing health conditions that include diabetes and heart disease.

Because PCOS can have a serious impact on your health, it’s important to know how to manage it. It won’t be cured with a hysterectomy or oophorectomy, so you’ll need to manage it for the rest of your life.

Read more about Do This – Not That: Living with PCOS

What ways are you becoming heart smart? Check out our steps to becoming heart smart!


If, despite all the red flags, you do nothing to minimize your risks for heart disease, you could suddenly find yourself dealing with a life threatening stroke or heart attack. Complacency and ignoring the warning signs of heart disease can kill you. If you do manage to live through the experience, you could have permanent, irreversible heart damage which will negatively impact you for the rest of your life. A stroke can also leave you physically and mentally impaired.

Is that what you want? Isn’t it better to take the time now to make better choices for better health?

Read more about 10 Steps to Being Heart Smart During Menopause