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Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

Laparoscopic Hysterectomy


Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy
Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy
Laparoscopic Supracervical

Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Defined

Laparoscopic hysterectomy is a minimally invasive surgery to remove your uterus. There are many types of laparoscopic hysterectomy: Lap Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy, Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy, Laparoscopic Supracervical (partial) Hysterectomy, Robotic Hysterectomy and Single Site Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

Read on for information about your options and talk about your decision with your personal surgeon.


Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy

Acronym: LAVH

Description of procedure: During a LAVH, several small cuts are made in the abdominal wall through which slender metal tubes called "trocars" are inserted to provide access for a laparoscope and other small surgical instruments. The laparoscope is like a tiny telescope with a camera attached to that provides a continuous image which is enlarged and projected onto a television screen.

Just like in a TAH or TVH , the uterus (including the cervix) is detached from the ligaments that attach it to other structures in the pelvis, and removed through a cut at the top of the vagina which is repaired with stitches.

Indications/contra-indications: Not all women are candidates for laparoscopic hysterectomies and the decision to use this method must be made on an individual basis.

Initial Recovery: Expect 4 to 6 weeks of recovery, with some lifting and straining restrictions that could extend beyond this period.

Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

Acronym: TLH

In this case, the surgery will still be performed entirely laparascopically.

Description of procedure: Just as a LAVH, tiny cuts are made in the abdominal wall to provide access for laparoscope and other surgical instruments. The uterus is removed through the tiny cuts in portions.

Indications/contra-indications: Not all women are candidates for laparoscopic hysterectomies and the decision to use this method must be made on an individual basis.

Initial Recovery: Although a shorter recovery time because there are fewer incisions, expect 4 to 6 weeks of recovery, with some lifting and straining restrictions that could extend beyond this period.

Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy

As you are making decisions about your hysterectomy, you may consider keeping your cervix. A supracervical hysterectomy removes the uterus but leaves the cervix in place, which some research suggests may reduce the risk of pelvic organ prolapse and preserve sexual function. This is sometimes referred to as “partial hysterectomy.”

Acronym: LSH

Description of procedure: This procedure is done completely laparoscopically and does not remove the cervix. The uterus is cut up into small pieces and removed through the tubes which were inserted into the abdomen.

Indications/contra-indications: Not all women are candidates for laparoscopic hysterectomies and the decision to use this method must be made on an individual basis.

Initial Recovery: Expect 2 to 4 weeks of recovery, with some lifting and straining restrictions that could extend beyond this period.

Variations on a theme: It is also possible that your doctor will perform a Total Laparascopic Hysterectomy. In this case, the surgery will still be performed entirely laparoscopically, but the cervix will be removed.


Possible additional surgical procedures performed at the same time:


Bilateral Salpingo and Oophorectomy

This involves the removal of both ovaries and of both tubes.

Acronym: BSO

Description of procedure: Sometimes, both ovaries and fallopian tubes are removed at the same time a hysterectomy is done. When both ovaries and both tubes are removed, it is called a bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy which is usually shortened to BSO. (bilateral=both sides, salpingo =the fallopian tubes, oophore =the ovaries, ectomy = removal)

Indications/contra-indications: The removal of ovaries is most often recommended when the ovaries are diseased. Your doctor may also recommend their removal in the case of cancers that are responsive to the hormones produced by the ovaries. If Endometriosis or Adenomyosis is suspected, some doctors will suggest the removal of ovaries. Removal of ovaries will throw you into surgical menopause which may result in hormonal unbalance and might put you at an increased risk for heart disease, some types of breast cancer and might trigger clotting disorders.

Initial Recovery: Your recovery will be based on the type of hysterectomy you had. Variations on a theme: Sometimes only the left or right ovary & tube are removed, and this is referred to as RSO or LSO


Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Stories



Page Created at 07-31-2007 - 01:45 AM, Last Modified 05-31-2014 - 11:21 AM
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