Tag Archives: heart disease

Does your risk for heart disease go up during menopause? How does menopause affect your heart?


Heart disease is serious. It’s the most common cause of death for adults. Your risks for heart disease are not as great as for men, until menopause. Then your risk is about the same.

There are risk factors for heart disease that you can’t control, but there are many risks that revolve around your lifestyle.

Read more about Be Heart Smart – Know Your Risk Factors for Heart Disease

How does menopause affect your heart? Is there a greater risk for heart disease during menopause?


Right now, you’re more concerned with figuring out menopause. It’s easy to dismiss heart disease, especially if you don’t know the truth about it. You might assume you don’t have to worry as it only happens to those who are obese, elderly, or smokers. You may even think it’s a man’s disease. Think again!

Read more about Be Smart: 7 Myths About Heart Disease

Do you how menopause can effect your heart? What increase of risks do you have during menopause?


Did you know that the effects of menopause could increase your risks for heart disease? That’s the bad news about menopause and your heart. But the good news is: you can change or control the things that matter.

Estrogen has a positive impact on your heart. It keeps blood vessels flexible, helps with cholesterol levels, plays a role in circulation, has an affect on blood pressure, and more.

Read more about 5 Things that Matter (for Your Heart during Menopause)

Have you been dealing with heart disease since menopause? How is heart disease related to menopause?


Heart disease is the number one killer of women, and risk factors can increase as women age. Natural menopause is also a risk factor, and women with preexisting risk factors who have gone through menopause have an even higher risk for heart disease. Unfortunately, going into menopause early, such as following a bilateral oophorectomy (removal of the ovaries), also significantly increases risks for coronary heart disease.

Read more about Heart Disease and Menopause

Are you worried that taking HRT could increase your risk for heart disease?


In the past, doctors believed hormone therapy would reduce the risk of heart disease in menopausal women. Recent studies, however, indicate that this is not the case. In fact, the most recent studies indicate that women who start taking it several (10 or more) years after menopause are actually at a higher risk for heart disease.

Before you completely shut out the idea of hormone therapy, however, there are a few things to consider:

Read more about HRT and Heart Disease

Are you concerned with preventing heart disease now that you are in menopause?


In past years, doctors believed that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) helped prevent cardiovascular diseases in post-menopausal women. More recent research, however, indicates that this isn’t the case. In some cases, it can actually increase the risk of heart disease (HRT and Heart Disease).

The good news is that there is a better way to prevent heart disesase: live a healthy, active lifestyle.

Read more about HRT Alternatives | Preventing Heart Disease.

How do you exercise your heart? What exercises do you enjoy?


As a woman, heart disease is a serious, although often under discussed, health concern. Your risks further increase if you have a family history of heart disease or you’ve reached menopause. If your lifestyle has you sitting most of the time, you may be adding to your risks – but those are risks you can change.

Your heart is muscle, so it’s needs regular exercise, too. Movement makes it stronger and healthier. That means one way to reduce your risks for heart disease is to get moving and get your heart beating. While any movement is good, there are some specific types of exercises which can be especially helpful for your heart. Working exercise into your day can be especially helpful.

Read more about The Beat Goes On – Exercises for Your Heart.

What action are you taking for your heart?


According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), heart disease is a leading cause of death for women. That can be kind of scary. If you’ve never given much thought to your heart, it’s time now – especially with menopause lurking on the horizon.

There are a lot of little things in your life that you may not realize could have a big impact on the health of your heart. If you make your lifestyle healthier, you could reduce your risks for heart disease with heart-healthy choices.

Read more about Action – It’s What Your Heart Needs. 

What ways do you stay heart healthy?


You’ve heard it before and you’ll hear it again and again – get healthy. Sounds simple enough, but you know from experience it’s not. It takes time and effort to be healthy and with all that’s going on in your life, you may already feel like you’re burning the candle at both ends just to keep up. You’re not alone; lots of women feel that way. Unfortunately, your heart may be a ticking time bomb that’s shortening that candle with every passing day.

Heart disease is a leading cause of death in women and your risks go up with menopause. Developing heart disease could shorten your life span considerably and limit your abilities during your remaining years. Put that way, it makes it more imperative that you take steps now to be healthy – no matter how busy you are – while you still have a chance to try to prevent heart disease or reverse some of its effects.

Read more about Healthy Life – Healthy Heart.

Are you concerned with heart disease? How are you heart smart to help prevent heart disease?


Heart disease is serious. It’s the most common cause of death for adults. Your risks for heart disease are not as great as for men, until menopause. Then your risk is about the same.

There are risk factors for heart disease that you can’t control, but there are many risks that revolve around your lifestyle. Those you can control – if you want to. It’s your choice. You can create a lifestyle that reduces your risks for heart diseaseand gives you a fighting chance, despite any uncontrollable risks. But it will take some commitment on your part.

Read more about Be Heart Smart – Know Your Risks Factors for Heart Disease.