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If you have an ADHD child READ If you have an ADHD child READ

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  #1  
Unread 03-05-2004, 11:07 AM
Smile - If you have an ADHD child READ If you have an ADHD child READ

My Special Education Journey from Emotions to Advocacy
by Becky Milton
  Quote:
Our special education journey started 10 years ago at a small rural county in southeastern Georgia. My son had been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder at age 5.

In the 2nd grade he was put in a Behavior Modification class for 30 minutes per day and eventually graduated to 60 minutes and 90 minutes. As a result more time was taken away from his regular classes and more time was spent in school suspension and out of school suspension.

I was contacted by his teachers on a daily basis and principals/vice principals at least once a week.....

<Admin note: Content has been edited to adhere to site Guidelines, which help to protect against Copyright infringement>

To read the entire article:
http://www.fetaweb.com/success/empower.bmilton.htm

Becky Milton lives in Georgia where she helps other parents advocate for their children.
www.adhdexpertsoncall.com This one I just found worth a look.

[email protected] My support group Great Gals!!!
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/misunderstoo...attention.html ***Really Cool one!!!
wrightslaw.com good for finding out the laws regarding ADHD

http://www.kidstogether.org/iepd.htm This is another site I recently found. It looks to have a lot of good info to read over.
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  #2  
Unread 03-05-2004, 12:21 PM
If you have an ADHD child READ

That's a very sad story, but it's not indicitive of all special education programs or teachers. I teach in a special ed program, and what you've described (the isolation room, and isolation in the lunch room) would not be tolerated, and would be punishible where I teach. I do believe parents have to be strong advocates for their children, and be aware of what is going on at their school. Most good teachers welcome that. Thanks for the info! s

Marta
  #3  
Unread 03-05-2004, 01:22 PM
If you have an ADHD child READ

I can' t tell you how much your story touched me. I feel like I am going through a similar situation with my six year old. He was recently diagnosed with ADHD and all school year I feel like I have been fighting with his school. They have also sat my son at a table by himself during lunch, telling him he is not allowed to talk to others. Taken away his recess priviledges and set him in a desk in the back corner of the class so he will not be a distraction to others. The more they isolate him, the worse the situation gets. I appreciate you sharing your situation, and will continue fighting for my son's rights.
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  #4  
Unread 03-05-2004, 01:40 PM
dachielover *** Glad your understand

I am glad that your school is good with these guys but it has not been the case for alot of us. Last year my son was "fired" by his teacher. This for not turning in some homework. This meant that he was required to sit backwards in the desk for the whole day and he was not allowed to do any of his school work at school that whole day. He was not allowed recess or any other activitiy that day. He was forced to bring the whole days work home as homework or suffer "0" for the missed work. Needless to say I was more then a little mad about this action by a so call Wonderful teacher. I spoke with the principal about the matter and she was told she couldn't do it anymore. I have since heard that she is using it again this school year.

The teacher my son has now is pretty good. She is at least willing to hear me out on things and doesn't go out of her way to single out my son for his problems. He is making good grades again. We are trying to get him set up for success in Middle school next year. The worst part is the year before the Witch he was on honor roll.
  #5  
Unread 03-05-2004, 02:54 PM
If you have an ADHD child READ

Hi Kygal,

It sounds terrible, what you've gone through with your son. I'm so sorry you've had to deal with this humiliating experience. I just wanted you to know that there are some good programs out there. I hope and pray you can find a better situation for your son. I guess some schools still use these outdated or draconian behavior mod programs, and/or leave it up to the individual teacher to create one, which sometimes works/sometimes doesn't. We have very strict guidelines, and isolation is not one of them. You are doing the best thing that you can, which is to become educated about your options for your son. Glad to hear your son is doing better this year. You sound like a caring Mom, and that will make a huge difference in his future. Good luck to you and your son,
Also, does your son have any hobbies/sports, etc. that he is good at? It also helps to have some outside of school activity that he enjoys to counter all this school pressure. Good luck to you!

Marta
  #6  
Unread 03-05-2004, 06:17 PM
My son & Disclaimer

My son is a great artist. He played football this past fall, he played basketball at his elem school and will be going to his first baseball practice on Sunday (HOPING FOR PRETTY WEATHER). His little brother is starting tee-ball which will be his first sport.

Disclaimer. The first post on this thead was NOT my son's story although he was started down that road. I have gone threw fire for my son which is why I posted it. This form had a simular string that I was trying to post it to. My intention was to share how important it is to go to bat for our children. I guess I should have explained that in the first post. Sorry if I confused anyone. MY younger brother had many of the same problems as the boy in the letter. He was 24 this week and as of to date his best job was the Mouse at Chuck-E- Cheese. I want so much more for my son and I know you ladies do too for your sons and daughters as the case may be. My brother never completed his Freshman year of High School. He was never DX or got any help. My son will never have that problem. My son make me crazy 75% of the time but he is getting as much help as I can get for him. He is active in many sports, he does pretty good in school (Better then I did) and with any luck he will grow up and be something wonderful when he grows up.
  #7  
Unread 03-06-2004, 08:22 AM
If you have an ADHD child READ

KyGal, thank you so much for sharing Becky's story. In a lot of ways, her son's story has also been my son's story

(((Marta)))) Can we move to your district? I live in Canada, in a district where ADHD is recognized as a Learning Disability, but does not qualify for Special Eds: according to our Public Education law, schools are only obliged to ensure that a child succeeds... they have no obligation to ensure that the child succeeds at his level. For our DS, who's also gifted, this meant that he wasn't entitled to any accommodations, since he was succeeding, barely, accademically.

It got to the point where, this school year, his first year of High School (High School starts in Grade 7 over here ), he was afraid of going to school (because the endless teasing and isolation had finally gotten to him) and would end up with constant headaches. Got to the point where he'd missed 6 weeks of school before he was, finally, admitted to an in-patient schooling program at the local psychiatric facility.

He started this program in early December. He's since made tremendous progress: going from refusing to do any school work, on a consistent basis, to our having a meeting to discuss his re-integration in regular school. The meeting will take place on December 18th. He's now proud of himself, has lost weight and is getting involved in weight-lifting, an activity he enjoys.

I agree that we have to be advocates for our children. In our district, accommodations for these children mostly involves in sanctionning, pushing, suspending, removing privileges and, mostly, not understanding that these children do not start the day planning to loose it. Most of the time, my son starts the day planning to be good and something happens that sets him off. That was one of the first things they told us, at the hospital: he doesn't act this way on purpose. They also found out that he has a major problem in class when there are other kids in the classroom. That's in an environment where the highest number of kids in the classroom is 5 kids So, imagine how it is in a regular classroom of 30 kids
  #8  
Unread 03-06-2004, 08:48 AM
If you have an ADHD child READ

((((Dany)))),

I'm sorry about your son's school problems. New Jersey has a large Special Ed population, so it is true, our laws are more progressive. But, implementing them, is well, another story altogether. The laws are strict though, and integration as much as possible is the goal. Also, parents have a lot of power (by law) to be involved in decision making. I don't want you to think it's all a bed of roses though, there are still many teachers/administrators who either don't want to deal with, or don't feel they should have to deal with, the kid who doesn't fit in the box, so to speak. I know what you mean about accomodations (punishing after the fact), that still happens here as well. But, I'm sorry that your son doesn't receive any help to achieve at his grade level. You are absolutely right, most of these kids don't come to school wanting to act out, but it becomes a vicious cycle. Do they use an IEP (Individualized Education Program), which they review frequently, or something like it, in Canada? Dany, is he on medication? Most of all, these kids need people around them who don't give up on them! I'm glad your son found an activity he loves, that's so important. My best wishes to you and your son, I hope he gets something out of this program, and is able to re-integrate into his regular school. Let me know how he's doing, s

Marta
  #9  
Unread 03-06-2004, 09:31 PM
If you have an ADHD child READ

Dear (((((Marta))))) thanks for replying

My son is doing much better in that program: as I mentionned, he found an activity he loves. Furthermore, he's not got friends (both at school and in the area where we lived), tends to have much more varied interests (he just created a web-page tonight... ok, it's simple and I helped him, but it's more than he would have done a year ago) and he's happier than I've seen him in a long, long time.

He is on several medications, but his doctor (who is simply terrific) is planning to wean him some of them as he improves. But, as you probably know, the meds are not a miracle answer: we still need to work at it, with him. Most of all, he needs to find a way to control his emotions and reactions.

He was home during March break, and things were much better than they'd been in a long, long time. I now know that he should have benefitted from such a program a long time ago.

BTW, we do not have the IEP system over here. What we have, instead, is a Personal Intervention Plan... not quite the same
  #10  
Unread 03-21-2004, 09:27 PM
If you have an ADHD child READ

Hi ladies,

I read this thread and just wanted to share something with you.
My wonder boy is also 6 and was labeled distracting to others, etc. My mom has voiced her opinion for years saying that my son must have ADD/ADHD and we should have him put on something to help control things now. She is not the only person that has made these remarks. My DH and I don't believe that we should be stuffing drugs down his throat for the convenience of others so I did some investigating. We were having problems with the way our son was being labeled and managed at school.

Some of what I have found on my own is that kids are not allowed to be kids anymore and it's easier to pass out meds than to take the time to work with your child in a constructive fashion. Also, I found a book put out by a psychologist called "Ritalin Is Not The Answer" by David B. Stein, Ph.D., in it he teaches parents how to work with their kids and the school system to make our often times "gifted" children more productive. Also, we just took him for a true eye exam and low and behold the little bugger not only needed glasses, he needed bifocals.

Imagine that, since we have been working on the techniques from the book I mentioned and getting him glasses, our son is like a new kid, and it's only been about a month so far.

s

Donna
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