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Pain med fears Pain med fears

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  #1  
Unread 04-15-2004, 04:56 PM
Pain med fears

I don't know if this is the appropriate forum for this, so if I'm out of line, I understand.

I'm on oxycodone, and have been on narcotic pain meds fairly consistently since last June (when the endo decided it was time to mutiply). Started with codeine, (no relief) went to vicodin, did a 2 day stint with dilaudid (the side effects forced me to stop) and have been on oxycodone since October. I'm taking 1 pill per day, only if the pain is horrible. Some days I don't take any.

Do I have a problem? I don't get a high feeling with it, I only feel better because the pain is gone. My co-worker is always asking me if I like the buzz, but frankly, I never got a buzz. Do people actually get buzzed if they take narcotics as prescribed?

I'm just so concerned. With my recent swelly belly, and pressure, I took a pill this afternoon, and DH is teasing me, saying I"m a druggie. I know he's just teasing, but I'm worried.

Laura (if I sound totally paranoid, blame it on the hormones, or lack thereof!)
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  #2  
Unread 04-15-2004, 06:37 PM
(((Laura)))

Hi hun...

You and I are at about the same spot. I'm taking vicodin for endo/adhesion pain and have taken it since last November. I was taking up to 3 pills a day but went down to 1 a day out of fear of addiction. I've never experienced addiction before, but I wanted to be sure I wouldn't start now.

As far as what I've been told, if you take the meds for pain then it does what it's suppose to do. If you are abusing the drug you wouldn't be referrencing the pain aspect, you'd be only concerned with a constant supply of meds.

I don't get a high either. I never have. I understand some people do...but I'm like you, it doesn't do anything but help ease the pain.

If the comments people make upset you (they would upset me) then it's okay to tell them you're struggling with real pain issues and you need understanding about that. Tell them that drug medications used to treat real pain are a valid medical treatment and not part of a drug addiction. You may just want to let them know you already feel defensive (or however you'd like to say it) about using a drug that people link to addiction, but in your case it is medically neccessary.

Hun, if you're taking the vicodin for pain then you don't have a problem (with the drug anyways). You have a problem with pain...and you don't have to be ashamed to need something to help ease the pain.

Are you working with a pain management specialist? If not, it might help you to feel like you are working closely with someone who understands chronic pain and medications to treat that. If my next surgery doesn't work at easing the pain then I'll look for a good pain management doctor to work with. I want someone responsible for helping me with long term pain.

(((Laura))) I'm sorry you are in so much pain hun. You aren't alone. I can't tell you for sure (I'm not a doctor), but based on what you've said here you don't have a drug addiction problem. You're simply a (((sister))) in pain who deserves some relief!

Hugs,

Rita
  #3  
Unread 04-15-2004, 07:41 PM
Addiction

((((Laura))))
I know how you feel about taking the meds. I have been on hydrocone for sometime now and my dr and I are worried about dependence but there is a big difference between dependence and addiction. It is not our fault that this pain can't be controlled without meds and it is unfair to you and the ones you love to neglect taking care of yourself by not controlling your pain. I had a hard time understanding that. But I found if I didn't keep my pain under control I was snappy with my kids hubby and everyone. I to am worried about taking all the meds but I am going into pain clinic on May 14th to hopefully help me manage my pain a little better. I am currently taking Avinza which is a long lasting time released morphine based pill once a day, I have continually told the dr that I don't think it is working and since I have been taking it I have been having terrible headaches. But his way of thinking is he would rather me take that one pill than take the shorter acting meds. Which would be fine if it worked. But you know drs you can't argue with them.
Please know that their are several articles on chronic pain patients and addiction. Surferbabe can help you out alot on that she is very helpful and compassionate in that area.
You should try to PM her for some info.
I hope this helps try not to beat your self up they say as long as you take the meds as directed and for pain you will not become addicted. There have been alot of studies.
LOL
Jeni

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  #4  
Unread 04-16-2004, 05:56 AM
Pain med fears

((((Laura))))), (((Jeni)))) and ((((Rita)))) as you've most likely read from posts in this forum, recent research points to the notion that taking meds as prescribed to manage actual chronic pain is unlikely to result in addiction. The two things that may occur is dependance on the meds and tolerance to the meds.

Dependance occurs when you depend on the meds in order to live a normal life. They may become a little like a crutch and you may feel like you won't be able to make it if you run out of the meds. That's still not addiction.

Tolerance occurs when your body gets used to the meds and the dosage you're taking is no longer controlling your pain. This results in having to take a stronger dose or in having to take other meds to control the break through pain. Another option is to switch to another kind of pain meds. This still is not addiction.

Addiction may bring on that buzz: I don't know, I've, thankfully, never been there. But what really makes it an addiction is that you'll be physically sick if you run out of the meds. Not with necessarily with additional pains, though this may be part of it, but with the chills, changes in sleep pattern, etc. that is associated with withdrawal symptoms.

If you can go a few days without feeling sick, you are not addicted. If you feel you won't make it without your pain meds, you may be dependant, but not addicted and if you find out that the dosage you're taking is not enough, you've developped a tolerance, but are still not addicted.

What recent studies have shown is just how devastating living with unmanaged, uncontrolled chronic pain can be. Not only does it affect you physically, it affects you mentally. It affects all aspects of your life!!! That's why more and more doctors believe in pain management. That's why, these days, managing our pain after surgery is so important!!! Because while your body is trying to cope with the pain, it can't heal, it can't rest and it all becomes a vicious circle. And, the longer you're in pain, the more your body gets used to it: it can tolerate more and more pain, while, at the same time, all this pain is taking it's toll on your body.

((((Laura)))), ((((Rita)))), ((((Jeni))))) please, do take those meds as prescribed. And, if at all possible, ignore the teasing. To tell your DH that you are not addicted and that this is the right thing to do. Find and print the research on Pain Management and show it to your spouses and to your co-workers, so that they will understand just was is going on with you.
  #5  
Unread 04-16-2004, 06:49 AM
Habit Forming Drugs

well this is right up my alley .. I am a recovered Heroin addict .. I have beenclean for11years ...had3 surgerys wthin 3 months ... needless to say I was on pain killers for a long time .. fortunatly because of my expeirence I can give advice on this subject .. your body has developed a tolerance to the Opiate based drugs .. so in order to control the pain or feel a buzz unfortunatly you will have to take more than you have been taking .. and let me tell you when you finally come off these drugs if you ever do you will need help .. weining off slowley is the only way .. then you will need something for your blood pressure and anxiety ( Xanax or Catapress ) is what they gave me . I don't like to tell the doctors of my experiences with this because they look at me in a different light .. but the new D.O. I found ..ohh she is sooo cool and knows all to well about Drug Dependency !
  #6  
Unread 04-16-2004, 06:55 AM
Re: Habit Forming Drugs

  Quote:
Originally posted by erins
well this is right up my alley .. I am a recovered Heroin addict .. I have beenclean for11years ...had3 surgerys wthin 3 months ... needless to say I was on pain killers for a long time .. fortunatly because of my expeirence I can give advice on this subject .. your body has developed a tolerance to the Opiate based drugs .. so in order to control the pain or feel a buzz unfortunatly you will have to take more than you have been taking .. and let me tell you when you finally come off these drugs if you ever do you will need help .. weining off slowley is the only way .. then you will need something for your blood pressure and anxiety ( Xanax or Catapress ) is what they gave me . I don't like to tell the doctors of my experiences with this because they look at me in a different light .. but the new D.O. I found ..ohh she is sooo cool and knows all to well about Drug Dependency !
Let me just add I am as big a baby as everyone else when it comes to pain and I will take every pain pill they give me ! You have developed a tolerance and are not a druggy ..a druggys whole life revolves around getting drugs for the day ,sleep, eat and to function properly .. but your body does have a tolerance because of the length of time you have been taking the pain meds .
  #7  
Unread 04-16-2004, 08:28 AM
Pain med fears

Laura:



If your friends and family really thought you had a drug addiction, I don't think they would be joking about it. At least, I hope that if they were really concerned, they would lovingly sit you down for an "intervention".

For instance, my husband calls zoloft my "crazy pills". He doesn't really think I am mentally ill, just needing a bit of help coping with stress and pain. Joking is his way of dealing with a problem he can not "fix". He's a man of action and it is really hurting him that I have had pain and that there is no ultimate "fix". Is it insensitive and perhaps misguided of him? Of course! But, he's only human and has to have some way of expressing his feelings - for him, that's humor.

So, again, please take your meds AS DIRECTED BY YOUR PHYSICIAN to control your pain. Based on what you have said, I doubt you even have a dependency. If you had built a tolerance, you would need to take MORE than prescribed to address the pain, not less.

Hang in there. Be a good or I'll send the pillow over to take care of you, missy!

Lots of s
  #8  
Unread 04-16-2004, 10:41 AM
Pain med fears

  Quote:
I'm taking 1 pill per day, only if the pain is horrible. Some days I don't take any.
(((Laura))) ,
When using these meds to treat pain the risk of addiction is less than 2%. There are Chronic Pain Patients who have to take these type of meds in order to have some semblance of a life Many have used them for several years...are they addicted? Most likely, NO. Addiction occurs when the meds are used to achieve a *high* not to relieve pain. Most often, pain patients will feel no *high* as the meds go straight to the source of the pain! If this is experienced it could be also due to the fact that the dose is to high for the level of pain being experienced or that the Patient using them is new to the med. Most often, these symptoms will go away with time leaving us only with relief.

These type of meds, along with many, many others can result in a dependence, which is totally opposite from *addiction*. Addiction is a Physcological need for the meds, an addict will continually need more & more of the med to achieve the *high* they seek A Pain Patient can use the same dose for many months or years without an increase...
Dependence is Physical and can result in a physical withdrawal of the meds if taken for an extended period of time...they can be quite severe but can be controlled. This is why when taking these they shouldn't be stopped abruptly but weaned off gradually. There are many forms of medication that can cause the same symptoms, this still does not equal Addiction.

Here is a link to a recent thread discussing the same:
Pain Meds...

Also an excerpt discussing the differences of Addiction Vs dependence:

There is a critical difference between "addiction" and "tolerance:
  Quote:
"Tolerance" is a physical event that will always happen when a patient takes opioids, even w/just one dose. It is not linked to harmful effects. It only means, over time, patients can be expected to need higher doses to obtain the same relief.

Confusion between "addiction" and "tolerance" is common even among Drs. Distinction between the two is the patient's ability to function. Pain patients can expect to improve function with opioids. "Dependence" is another physical fact. It refers usually to the need to maintain opioid levels in a tolerant individual or experience withdrawal. Both addicts and legitimate pain patients will experience withdrawal if the drug is withdrawn abruptly.
Until a patient achieves pain relief there is no such thing as "too much" opioids. The limit on a dose is "what works." It is important not to assume that high dosages or a large prescriptions mean the patient is "an addict." Of course, this must be monitored to make sure that the dose is appropriate for that patient.
http://www.cancer-pain.org/treatments/treatments.html
I hope these help understand the difference between the 2

((((((((((((((((((hugs))))))))))))))))
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