Removal of part of the vaginal cuff due to recurring endo | HysterSisters
HysterSisters Hysterectomy Support and Information
Advertising Info HysterSisters Hysterectomy Support Tutorial

Go Back   Hysterectomy HysterSisters > Hysterectomy Special Needs > The Road Less Traveled


HysterSisters.com is a massive online community with over 475,000 members and over 5 million posts.

Our community is filled with women who have been through the Hysterectomy experience providing both advice and support from our active members and moderators.

HysterSisters.com is located at 111 Peter St, Toronto, Canada, M5V2H1 and is part of the VerticalScope network of websites.

With free registration, you can ask and answer questions in our HYSTERECTOMY forum community, get our FREE BOOKLET, access Hysterectomy Checkpoints and more.

You are not alone. The HysterSisters are here for you. Join us today!
join HysterSisters for hysterectomy resources and support
Reply

Removal of part of the vaginal cuff due to recurring endo Removal of part of the vaginal cuff due to recurring endo

Thread Tools
  #1  
Unread 04-03-2003, 06:43 PM
Removal of part of the vaginal cuff due to recurring endo

I had a complete hysterectomy (including ovaries) 7 years agao. I have recurring endo on the vaginal cuff (have had light spotting). The MD's want to remove part of the vaginal cuff through abdominal surgery. Has anyone had this done? Any problems afterwards? Also, was it done laproscopically and how long were they in the hospital? Thanks in advance.
GG
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Unread 04-04-2003, 09:17 AM
Removal of part of the vaginal cuff due to recurring endo

Hi there GG !

I'm so sorry that you are going thru this
I dont have any experience with this - I wish I could be of more help.
I'm sure that some of the others will be along shortly with some input on this.
Keep us updated & take care.



Susan
  #3  
Unread 04-04-2003, 12:56 PM
Removal of part of the vaginal cuff due to recurring endo

((GG)),
Here is some info I found on this surgery...Good Luck please keep us posted....(((hugs)))

  Quote:
I have the following observations. First, there is no medical treatment currently available that will kill or eliminate endometriosis, including Depo-provera. Both Prometrium and Depo-provera are progestational agents which may suppress the activity and thus the symptoms of endometriosis. I personally have not had very good results with this type of medical treatment. The long term concern, if you were to remain on Depo-provera and off of estrogen replacement, is the potential for developing osteoporosis. I have the following observations. First, there is no medical treatment currently available that will kill or eliminate endometriosis, including Depo-provera. Both Prometrium and Depo-provera are progestational agents which may suppress the activity and thus the symptoms of endometriosis. I personally have not had very good results with this type of medical treatment. The long term concern, if you were to remain on Depo-provera and off of estrogen replacement, is the potential for developing osteoporosis.

I don't personally believe that the estrogen made the endometriosis return. It may have facilitated the rate at which it returned but I do not believe that it caused new endometriosis to grow. If you have all of the endometriosis removed surgically you would be at a very low risk of recurrence. There is no know cure for endometriosis. There is always a chance of recurrence.

I believe a specific surgical approach offers the best chance of eliminating endometriosis from the body and thus minimizing the chance of recurrence of endometriosis and its symptoms from your life. I have had good results using this approach, which is based on the reasoning as follows. If you have looked at pictures of endometriosis, it is evident that the disease is usually multifocal. By this I mean that there are numerous individual sites of endometriosis. Similar to the appearance of freckles. There can be a wide variety in both the appearance and size of the individual endometriotic lesions. Some are very small and can be missed if the peritoneum is not examined close-up with "near contact" laparoscopy, which provides maximal laparoscopic magnification. Several studies have shown a fairly high incidence of microscopic endometriosis in "normal" appearing peritoneum. This microscopic endometriosis will be missed even if the surgeon uses "near contact" laparoscopy or for that fact an operating microscope. Part if the key to successfully treating endometriosis patients and minimizing the rate of recurrence is ablation or resection of these microscopic lesions. This is accomplished by ablating or resecting all of the pelvic peritoneum. Second, patients which have undergone a hysterectomy for the treatment of endometriosis have by definition been through at least one surgery and often many more. If the endometriosis is not removed prior to the hysterectomy she is at an increased risk of having endometriosis buried as the tissue is clamped, cut and tied during the removal of the uterus. These areas need to be "undone", explored and removed during surgical treatment of post-hysterectomy endometriosis patients. The last critical point in the surgical treatment of this type of situation is careful evaluation and possible removal of the vaginal cuff. Nodularity and tenderness on pre-operative vaginal exam is indicative of vaginal cuff endometriosis. Once again the surgeon (even myself) cannot always see or even fell endometriosis in the vaginal cuff at the time of surgery. I have had cases which by preoperative assessment indicated vaginal cuff endometriosis, felt normal at the time of surgery and when removed, revealed the presence of endometriosis when examined by the pathologist under the microscope. I believe that aggressive and through treatment of post-hysterectomy "recurrent" endometriosis can and usually does result in resolution of symptoms without recurrence of endometriosis.

It is important to mention the team approach in treatment of this type of situation. All too often endometriosis is but just one of several conditions contributing to the patients symptoms. A careful history and physical examination will help lead the physician to a complete understanding of the patients situation. Examples of these other conditions include nerve damage and/or entrapment, bladder or bowel problems and even subluxation of the spine (misalignment of the spine).
https://www.hystersisters.com/vb2/new...threadid=96117
  Quote:
Laparoscopic Excision of Deep Fibrotic Endometriosis:

Excision of these lesions is often more difficult after hysterectomy than when a uterus is present. In this author's experience, fibrotic vaginal cuff lesions invariably involve one or both ureters and the base of the bladder. Careful dissection is necessary to free both the bladder anteriorly and the rectum posteriorly from the vaginal apex. Thereafter, the course of each ureter should be traced but not skeletonized. After this anatomy is identified, full-thickness excision of the vaginal cuff and rectal nodular lesions usually results in relief of the patient's pain and bleeding.

http://www.obgyn.net/hysteroscopy/hy..._excisioni_pg2
LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY FOR ADVANCED ENDOMETRIOSIS - http://www.emptyarms.co.uk/LAPAROSCO...METRIOSIS_.doc

Can extensive surgery for endometriosis be done on an outpatient basis?
  Quote:
Most patients return home the same day or are hospitalized overnight after surgery for extensive endometriosis. Patients usually experience some fatigue and discomfort for approximately 1 to 2 weeks after the operation, but they may perform gentle exercise such as walking and may return to routine activities within 1 week. Sexual activity may usually be resumed after 2 weeks. Examinations within 1 week are indicated for pain, pressure, or pyrexia. Routine checks at 1 to 6 weeks are usually not indicated because a pelvic examination could impede healing. The patient is examined 8 to 12 weeks postoperatively, by doing a rectovaginal examination to check for cul-de-sac nodularity, tenderness, or both.
http://www.prsucenter.com/dircor.html

http://forums.obgyn.net/forums/women...0103/3345.html
Reply

booklet
Our Free Booklet
What 350,000 Women Know About Hysterectomy: Information, helpful hints as you prepare and recover from hysterectomy.
Answers to your questions
Register




Thread Tools

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
From This Forum From Other Forums
3 Replies, Last Reply 01-03-2009, Started By butterfliesrfre
12 Replies, Last Reply 12-26-2005, Started By PMH
17 Replies, Last Reply 12-13-2004, Started By endo_chic
2 Replies, Last Reply 04-10-2003, Started By gg
9 Replies, Last Reply 02-10-2003, Started By mela
1 Reply, Last Reply 02-09-2003, Started By Leslie
1 Reply, Last Reply 06-19-2001, Started By Shinyface
2 Replies, Last Reply 06-12-2001, Started By Dbfx
47 Replies, Last Reply 05-09-2001, Started By Adrite
5 Replies, Last Reply 04-11-2001, Started By Pray4you
15 Replies, Endometriosis Support
10 Replies, Endometriosis Support
29 Replies, Hysterectomy Recovery (post hysterectomy)
2 Replies, Hysterectomy Recovery (post hysterectomy)
1 Reply, Hysterectomy Recovery (post hysterectomy)
3 Replies, Endometriosis Support
13 Replies, Hysterectomy Recovery (post hysterectomy)
6 Replies, Hysterectomy Recovery (post hysterectomy)
4 Replies, Hysterectomy Recovery (post hysterectomy)
5 Replies, Hysterectomy Recovery (post hysterectomy)



Advertisement

Hysterectomy News

September 24,2020

CURRENT NEWS

HysterSisters Takes On Partner To Manage Continued Growth And Longevity
I have news that is wonderful and exciting! This week’s migration wasn’t a typical migration - from one set ... News Archive

TODAY'S EVENTS

Calendar - Hysterectomies - Birthdays


Request Information


I am a HysterSister

HYSTERECTOMY STORIES

Featured Story - All Stories - Share Yours

FOLLOW US


Your Hysterectomy Date


CUSTOMIZE Your Browsing  



Advertisement


Advertisement